Tag Archives: pies

Plenty of Pumpkin Possibilities

Still have a pie pumpkin sitting around, or maybe you’re tempted by their sale price, but don’t know what to do with them? Although canning pumpkin butter is not recommended, there are plenty of other ways to prepare and preserve pumpkin. Just make sure that you are working with one of the smaller varieties of pumpkin, also called “sugar” or “pie” pumpkins. Otherwise, you’ll find the pumpkin flesh to be watery and stringy.

Cubed Pumpkin can be canned for future use in stews or sautées. It is also delicious roasted, perhaps with onion, garlic, and other yummy veggies. If you want pumpkin purée for soups, breads, pies, or pancakes, then get a few freezer bags ready for Freezing Pumpkin.  If you’re feeling adventurous, your inner child (or perhaps your actual child) will have fun drying and trying Spicy Pumpkin Leather. Here you’ll find recipes and instructions for each of these options.

Cubed Pumpkin (or Cubed Winter Squash)

If this is your first time canning, or if you could use a refresher of the basics, be sure to read Using Pressure Canners, and Principles of Home Canning before beginning.

Cubed pumpkin averages 2¼ pounds per quart jar, so decide your canner load: for 9 pints, you’ll need about 10 pounds, or for 7 quarts you’ll need about 16 pounds of pumpkin.

Procedure:

  1. Wash and remove seeds from pumpkin.
  2. Cut pumpkin into 1-inch wide slices, and peel.
  3. Cut flesh into 1-inch cubes.
  4. Boil 2 minutes in water (do not mash or purée!).
  5. Fill jars with cubes and cooking liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace.
  6. Adjust lids and process using the tables below.
Table 1. Recommended process time for Pumpkin and Winter Squash in a dial-gauge   pressure canner.

Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of

Style of Pack

Jar Size

Process Time

0 – 2,000 ft

2,001 – 4,000 ft

4,001 – 6,000 ft

6,001 – 8,000 ft

Hot

Pints

55 min

11 lb

12 lb

13 lb

14 lb

Quarts

90 min

11 lb

12 lb

13 lb

14 lb

Table 2. Recommended process time for Pumpkin and Winter Squash in a weighted-gauge   pressure canner.

Canner Pressure (PSI) at Altitudes of

Style of Pack

Jar Size

Process Time

0 – 1,000 ft

Above 1,000 ft

Hot

Pints

55 min

10 lb

15 lb

Quarts

90 min

10 lb

15 lb

 

 

Freezing Pumpkin

Select a full-colored mature pumpkin with fine texture.

Procedure:

  1. Wash, cut into cooking-size sections and remove seeds.
  2. Cook until soft in boiling water, in steam, in a pressure cooker or in an oven.
  3. Remove pulp from rind and mash.
  4. To cool, place pan containing pumpkin in cold water and stir occasionally.
  5. Package in freezer bags or a sealable plastic container, leaving ½-inch headspace.
  6. Seal and freeze.

Spicy Pumpkin Leather

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups fresh pumpkin, cooked and puréed
  • ½ cup honey
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8  teaspoon powdered cloves

Procedure:

  1. Add honey, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves to the cooked and puréed pumpkin. Blend well.
  2. Spray fruit roll liner tray with vegetable oil (for electric dehydrators) or line cookie sheet with plastic wrap (for ovens that register as low as 140-145°F). Spread mixture evenly on tray or sheet, at a depth of ¼ inch.
  3. Dry at 140°F for 6-12 hours. After 6 hours, begin checking for doneness by pressing fingertip near center of leather. It’s done when no impression is left.
  4. Cut leather into quarters then place each piece on a piece of plastic wrap that is slightly wider than the leather- this allows you to roll the leather together with the plastic wrap, twisting the ends of the plastic to seal.
  5. Seal in a freezer bag and keep in a cool, dark place for storage up to one month.

Pumpkin Leather

For original articles, go to “How do I?” “Can” and “Dry” on the National Center for Home Food Preservation website.

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Apples are Peaking! Choose the Best Preservation Method

Did you know that once an apple tree begins to bear fruit, it will do so for a century? Today, there are over 2,500 varieties of apples grown in the United States. Fall weather brings the best fresh apples in bushels.

While we are in a season of peak apple production in many states, you might consider preserving some specialties that will add variety to menus throughout the year.  Apples can be dried, made into applesauce or apple butter, or even made into a delicious apple pear jam. Apples do not make the highest quality canned or frozen slices, but they can be preserved by those methods, also.

Whether you are buying apples by visiting the nearby orchard, the grocery store or market, or even picking apples from your own backyard, choose the preservation method that is best for your apple variety. Varieties that are good for freezing include: Golden Delicious, Rome Beauty, Stayman, Jonathan and Granny Smith. Varieties that are good for making applesauce and apple butter include: Golden Delicious, Rome Beauty, Stayman, Jonathan, Gravenstein and McIntosh. Red Delicious apples are best eaten fresh. They do not freeze or cook well.

When selecting your apples, remember that their flavor is best when they are at the peak of maturity.

Here are some options to prepare for and choose from in preserving your apples:

Making and canning a flavorful applesauce: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_02/applesauce.html

Making and canning a tasty, robust apple butter: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_02/apple_butter.html

For those who want a no-sugar added apple butter: (ours was developed  for sucralose as a sweetener) http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_02/apple_butter_reduced.html

Drying apple slices or rings: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/uga/uga_dry_fruit.pdf

Combining the best of fall fruits in tasty pear-apple jam: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_07/pear_apple_jam.html

Making old-fashioned, pretty crabapple jelly: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_07/crabapple_jelly.html

Canning fun, cinnamon-flavored spiced apple rings: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_02/apple_rings_spiced.html

Canning a special, spicy gift quality apple chutney: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_06/apple_chutney.html

And, for all those extra apple slices to save for pies and desserts later in the year, freezing: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/freeze/apple.html

Additional ideas and preservation methods are available from the National Center for Home Food Preservation at the University of Georgia, www.homefoodpreservation.com.


For original article, go to the National Center for Home Food Preservation website.